Sometimes the big banks and investment firms tied into Wall Street have gotten a bad name for being less inclusive towards middle class everyday investors, or simply giving investment advice that’s good or bad just to make a profit. One hedge fund manager is changing this looking to bring lower income people into the inner circle of investing.

That man is Brad Reifler who has seen how regulations and restrictions on certain investment funds have left out an important demographic of investors, and he’s already begun taking steps at his own company, Forefront Capital to allow them to invest in alternative funds.

Brad Reifler doesn’t believe that non-accredited investors should be limited to only investing through the stock market because he understands how volatile it can be and suggests having alternative funds to offset investments there.

He also thinks there needs to be more transparency between managers and investors and believes investors need to know their manager before investing with them. Learn more about Brad Reifler:

According to Crunchbase, Brad Reifler also says that investors need to have goals in mind when investing and stick to them, rather than getting sidetracked by any other side deals that brokers or managers offer. Reifler has learned a lot of these principles from life experiences over the last 30 or so years.

Bloomberg revealed to us that Brad Reifler got his bachelor’s degree from Bowdoin College and entered the investment consulting world. He founded his first company in 1982, the Reifler Trading Company which specialized in various global derivatives and discretionary accounts, and in 10 years it became Reifler Capital Management.

In 1995 when Refco took over, Reifler became head of the Institutional Sales Desk where he managed foreign exchange securities, equities, derivatives and other vehicles for fortune 500 companies and other clients. He also founded Pali Capital in 1995 and ran that company until 2009 when he started Forefront Capital.

Over the years Brad Reifler ran into some personal difficulties that had him reconsidering including unaccredited investors. He once tried to save up a college fund for his young daughters that never gained the interest it was supposed to when it matured.

And his father once wanted his life savings invested into a solid retirement account, but Brad Reifler found that because his father wasn’t accredited he couldn’t place the money in funds that he preferred.

So he began working with the SEC and other investment bankers and soon started a public investment fund at Forefront Capital that allowed anyone to invest in it for just $2,500. It’s been a good start for Reifler who wants to see more options like that become available.